Amphibians and Reptiles in Selected Sites in Palawan Province, the Philippines

Latest version published by HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. on May 5, 2019 HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc.

We report here a sample-event dataset of herpetofaunal surveys conducted by HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc., and partners in selected sites in Palawan Province, the Philippines. We used a combination of systematic sampling using standardized techniques and opportunistic sampling to survey the diversity of amphibians and reptiles in the following sites: (1) Mabentangen Creek, Barangay Poblacion 6, Municipality of Coron, Busuanga Island; (2) Estrella River Falls Park, Barangay Estrella, Municipality of Narra, Palawan Island; (3) Palawan Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Center, Barangay Irawan, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan Island; (4) Palawan Center for Sustainable Development Training Center, Barangay Irawan, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan Island. Our survey resulted in distribution records of 14 species of frogs and toads (Class Amphibia: Order Anura: seven families), seven species of snakes, lizards, and geckos (Class Reptilia: Order Squamata: three families) and one turtle (Class Reptilia: Order Testudines:Family Geomydidae). More importantly, we present here our survey on the abundance of amphibian and reptiles in human-modified and disturbed natural habitats in the surveyed sites. Several species have yet to be identified. These results contribute to the growing body of knowledge on the distribution of many species in the region.

This survey is part of an invasive alien species-targeted monitoring programme and a long-term biodiversity monitoring programme of HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. The dataset will be updated annually by HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. The development of this dataset was made possible through the project of HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc., in collaboration with the Biodiversity Management Bureau of the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (BMB-DENR) and The University of Santo Tomas – Biodiversity, Ecology, Systematics, and Taxonomy Group (BEST): “Alien Amphibians and Reptiles, a Threat to Philippine Biosecurity: Developing a National Invasive Alien Amphibian and Reptile Species Inventory and Occurrence Database and an Observation and Monitoring System” Project (BIFA03_26) funded by the Ministry of the Environment, Government of Japan.

Data Records

The data in this sampling event resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 58 records. 1 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

  • Event (core)
    58
  • Occurrence 
    126

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 58 records in English (12 KB) - Update frequency: not planned
Metadata as an EML file download in English (27 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (20 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Pili A (2019): Amphibians and Reptiles in Selected Sites in Palawan Province, the Philippines. v1.2. HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc.. Dataset/Samplingevent. https://cloud.gbif.org/bifa/resource?r=palawan_herps&v=1.2

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc.. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: d1c7d4a8-8494-427d-a3d7-c2ac3251635c.  HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by Participant Node Managers Committee.

Keywords

Samplingevent; Herpetofauna; Amphibians; Reptiles; the Philippines

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Arman Pili
Science Research Specialist
HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. #1198 Benavidez St., Unit 1202, Tondo 1003 Manila City Metropolitan Manila PH

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Arman Pili
Science Research Specialist
HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. #1198 Benavidez St., Unit 1202, Tondo 1003 Manila City Metropolitan Manila PH
Mae Diesmos
Corporate Secretary
HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. #1198 Benavidez St., Unit 1202, Tondo 1003 Manila City Metropolitan Manila PH
Arvin Diesmos

Who filled in the metadata:

Arman Pili
Science Research Specialist
HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. #1198 Benavidez St., Unit 1202, Tondo 1003 Manila City Metropolitan Manila PH

Who else was associated with the resource:

User
The Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Hosting Institution
The Global Biodiversity Information Facility Universitetsparken 15 DK-2100 Copenhagen DK +45 35 32 14 70
https://www.gbif.org/
User
Biodiversity Management Bureau - Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Biodiversity Management Bureau - Department of Environment and Natural Resources Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Center 1100 Quezon City Metropolitan Manila PH +(63 2) 9246031-35
http://www.bmb.gov.ph/
User
Palawan Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Center
Puerto Princesa South Road 5300 Puerto Princesa City Palawan PH
User
Tourism Office, Municipality of Narra, Palawan Province
Tourism Office, Municipality of Narra, Palawan Province Municipality Hall Narra Palawan PH

Geographic Coverage

The general geographic coverage of this dataset is Palawan Province, the Philippines. This dataset comprise of sample-event data from herpetofaunal surveys conducted in: (1) Mabentangen Creek, Barangay Poblacion 6, Municipality of Coron, Busuanga Island; (2) Estrella River Falls Park, Barangay Estrella, Municipality of Narra, Palawan Island; (3) Palawan Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Center, Barangay Irawan, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan Island; (4) Palawan Center for Sustainable Development Training Center, Barangay Irawan, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan Island.

Bounding Coordinates South West [7.711, 116.851], North East [12.361, 120.41]

Taxonomic Coverage

No Description available

Species  Leptobrachium tagbanorum,  Megophrys ligayae,  Kaloula pulchra,  Staurois nubilus,  Barbourula busuangensis,  Limnonectes acanthi,  Sanguirana sanguinea,  Pulchrana moellendorffi,  Ingerophrynus philippinicus,  Cyclemys dentata,  Gekko palawanensis,  Fejervarya vittigera,  Hoplobatrachus rugulosus,  Draco palawanensis,  Chaperina fusca,  Dendrelaphis levitoni,  Dendrelaphis marenae,  Coelognathus philippinus,  Polypedates macrotis,  Bronchocela cristatella,  Occidozyga laevis

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2018-09-11 / 2018-10-06

Project Data

Led by HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. (HWP) and in partnership with the Biodiversity Management Bureau of the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (BMB-DENR) and the Biodiversity, Ecology, Systematics and Taxonomy Group, University of Santo Tomas (BEST-UST), the main goal of the project is to fill taxonomic, geographical, and historical gaps in species occurrence and sampling-event data, focused on the alien amphibians and reptiles in the Philippines. Ultimately, using invasive reptiles and amphibians as a pilot study, the project will develop an online national platform for the long-term observation and monitoring of alien species invasions and trends. This Project will produce the much needed science-based information that can help guide the development and implementation of sound national biosecurity programmes for amphibian and reptile invasions, provide a reproducible framework for similar initiatives targeting other groups of alien taxa in the Philippines and other countries, and contribute to the Philippines’ international commitments to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and the International Convention on Biological Diversity’s Aichi Biodiversity Targets.

Title Biodiversity Information Fund for Asia (BIFA) – BIFA3_026: Alien Amphibians and Reptiles, a Threat to Philippine Biosecurity: Developing a National Invasive Alien Amphibian and Reptile Species Inventory and Occurrence Database and an Observation and Monitoring System
Identifier BIFA3_026
Funding The Ministry of the Environment, Government of Japan, through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Biodiversity Information Fund for Asia (BIFA) programme.
Study Area Description The geographic coverage of the Project is the Philippines.
Design Description The main goal of this Project is to fill taxonomic, geographical, and historical gaps in species occurrence and sampling-event data, focused on the 13 alien amphibians and reptiles in the Philippines, and develop an online national platform for long-term observation and monitoring of alien species invasions, with alien amphibian and reptile as pilot group. This will be achieved by: (1) assembling historical and geographical data from literature and natural history collections; (2) generating species occurrence and sampling-event data by conducting targeted herpetofaunal surveys in two key conservation areas, namely, Ilocos Norte Province, Luzon Island and Palawan Island, Palawan Province; (3) reconstruct invasion histories and develop ‘Pest Risk Maps’; and, (4) ultimately, developing an observation and monitoring system, named “DAYO” (filipino for “alien”) which we envision to be an online, open-access national platform and repository of species occurrence data and sampling-event data dedicated to invasive alien species in the Philippines, with alien amphibians and reptiles as pilot group, in the form of a web portal and a smartphone application. (5) In addition, Information campaigns and training workshops targeting key stakeholders (i.e., communities, environmental managers) will be conducted to promote and encourage citizen science and contributions from volunteers. HerpWatch Pilipinas, Inc. (HWP) leads the project in assembling species occurrence and sampling-event data, conducting herpetofaunal surveys, data analysis, preparation of data papers and original articles for publication, preparation of technical and financial reports, and official communication with GBIF-BIFA. The Biodiversity Management Bureau of the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR-BMB) helps in the design and execution of project and logistics in information campaigns and training workshops. The University of Santo Tomas – Biodiversity, Ecology, Systematics, and Taxonomy Group (BEST) provides consultancy and support for meeting venues, fieldwork, and laboratory.

The personnel involved in the project:

Sampling Methods

We conducted systematic herpetofaunal surveys following the protocol of timed visual encounter survey (transect and patch sampling method; Crump & Scott 1994). We established a total of thirty 10 X 100m standardized transect strips, spaced 100m apart, in different habitat types (e.g., along the road, along streams in secondary growth forests, trail and non-trail transects in secondary growth forests), in an effort to avoid sampling bias. Moreover, we established one-hectare habitat patches in human-modified habitats (e.g., agricultural and built-up areas). We surveyed transect and habitat patches for approximately 45 minutes during day-light (07:00–10:00 h) and at night (18:00–23:00 h). To avoid disturbance, we made sure that transects surveyed during the day were not traversed at night, and vice-versa, on successive days/nights. We also conducted general observations and opportunistic sampling around the camp and trails to maximize information collected from the study areas. We searched for animals by visually scanning the ground, over rocks and boulders, in pits, cavities, and crevices of limestone karsts, and vegetation, while raking the forest floor litter, probing epiphytes and tree hollows, upturning dead logs, debris, rocks, and man-made items. The animals that we encountered during the surveys were recorded, as were associated data, including their habitat and activity upon first notice (e.g., calling, foraging, mating, etc.). We collected a limited number of voucher specimens for each species that was encountered and were preserved following McDiarmid (1994) and Gotte et al. (2016). We followed the field survey protocols as outlined in an existing active Wildlife Gratuitous Permit to Collect (GP) No. 2018-33 (c/o Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, Arman N. Pili, and colleagues HerpWatch Pilipinas, inc.) provided by the Palawan Center for Sustainable Development. We followed Brown & Alcala (1978), Brown & Alcala (1980), Alcala and Brown (1998), and Alcala (1986) for initial species identification. These identifications were verified by A.C. Diesmos. We adopted the taxonomic arrangements of AmphibiaWeb (2019), Amphibian species of the world (Frost 2019), and the Reptile Database (Uetz et al. 2019).

Study Extent The general geographic coverage of this dataset is Palawan Province, the Philippines. This dataset comprise of sample-event data from herpetofaunal surveys conducted in: (1) Mabentangen Creek, Barangay Poblacion 6, Municipality of Coron, Busuanga Island; (2) Estrella River Falls Park, Barangay Estrella, Municipality of Narra, Palawan Island; (3) Palawan Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Center, Barangay Irawan, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan Island; (4) Palawan Center for Sustainable Development Training Center, Barangay Irawan, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan Island.
Quality Control The dataset was cleaned and validated using OpenRefine and Species Names Resolver. The dataset was standardized to Darwin Core format.

Method step description:

  1. Sampling and Survey method -- systematic herpetofaunal surveys following the protocol of timed visual encounter survey (transect and patch sampling method; Crump & Scott 1994). We established a total of thirty 10 X 100m standardized transect strips, spaced 100m apart, in different habitat types (e.g., along the road, along streams in secondary growth forests, trail and non-trail transects in secondary growth forests), in an effort to avoid sampling bias. Moreover, we established one-hectare habitat patches in human-modified habitats (e.g., agricultural and built-up areas). Survey method -- We surveyed transect and habitat patches for approximately 45 minutes during day-light (07:00–10:00 h) and at night (18:00–23:00 h). To avoid disturbance, we made sure that transects surveyed during the day were not traversed at night, and vice-versa, on successive days/nights. We also conducted general observations and opportunistic sampling around the camp and trails to maximize information collected from the study areas. We searched for animals by visually scanning the ground, over rocks and boulders, in pits, cavities, and crevices of limestone karsts, and vegetation, while raking the forest floor litter, probing epiphytes and tree hollows, upturning dead logs, debris, rocks, and man-made items. The animals that we encountered during the surveys were recorded, as were associated data, including their habitat and activity upon first notice (e.g., calling, foraging, mating, etc.). The animals that we encountered during the surveys were recorded, as were associated data, including their habitat and activity upon first notice (e.g., calling, foraging, mating, etc.).
  2. Preservation method -- We collected a limited number of voucher specimens for each species that was encountered and were preserved following McDiarmid (1994) and Gotte et al. (2016). We followed the field survey protocols as outlined in an existing active Wildlife Gratuitous Permit to Collect (GP) No. 2018-33 (c/o Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, Arman N. Pili, and colleagues HerpWatch Pilipinas, inc.) provided by the Palawan Center for Sustainable Development.
  3. Permit -- We followed the field survey protocols as outlined in an existing active Wildlife Gratuitous Permit to Collect (GP) No. 2018-33 (c/o Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, Arman N. Pili, and colleagues HerpWatch Pilipinas, inc.) provided by the Palawan Center for Sustainable Development.
  4. Specimen identification and taxonomic reference -- We followed Brown & Alcala (1978), Brown & Alcala (1980), Alcala and Brown (1998), and Alcala (1986) for initial species identification. These identifications were verified by A.C. Diesmos. We adopted the taxonomic arrangements of AmphibiaWeb (2019), Amphibian species of the world (Frost 2019), and the Reptile Database (Uetz et al. 2019).

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers d1c7d4a8-8494-427d-a3d7-c2ac3251635c
https://cloud.gbif.org/bifa/resource?r=palawan_herps